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Bishop Bill Wack, CSC podcast

Homilies and talks from Bishop Bill Wack, CSC. (Homilies before Aug. 22, 2017 are from "Fr. Bill Wack, CSC"!)
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Now displaying: 2019
Jul 15, 2019

Today's Gospel reading gives us the beloved story of The Good Samaritan.  Jesus tells this story as an answer to the scholar's question, "And who is my neighbor?"  However, Jesus turns the question around and asks the man, "Which of these was neighbor to the man who was beaten?"  The crux of the matter, then, is not that we should try to figure out which person is our neighbor (and which ones are not); rather we should put all of our attention into trying to BE neighbor to everyone.

(Sorry about the misquote in the homily!  I said, "Isaiah 55", when it really should be "Matthew 5".  Mea culpa.)

Jul 8, 2019

Today's readings -- and the presidential prayers for the Mass -- tell us that we should rejoice.  Isaiah's imagery is a bit shocking as he refers to Jerusalem (the New Jerusalem) as a Mother who delights in her children and plays with them on her lap.  In the Gospel, even as the disciples are reporting to Jesus about their progress following their first missionary activity, Jesus says to them, "Rejoice rather because your names are written in heaven."  In the midst of all of that, St. Paul writes to the Galatians that he will boast of nothing except the cross of Christ.  It is only by embracing our crosses that we are assured the glory of the Resurrection.

May 15, 2019

"My sheep know me and I know them."  "There is no snatching them from my hand."  Today as we celebrate Good Shepherd Sunday, we reflect on what it means to be united with our shepherd, Jesus Christ.  Hearing these words in the midst of the Easter Season reminds us that the goal of our lives is -- in the words of the Opening Prayer from today's Mass -- "to follow where our brave shepherd has gone."  As the Lord has ascended to heaven, we pray that we may be fully united with him in eternal life one day.

May 6, 2019

Today we hear about another Resurrection appearance to the disciples.  Like the other accounts, this one is not flashy, not dramatic at all.  Jesus appears to the disciples in very ordinary ways -- in today's case on the shore, eating breakfast with an incredulous group of disciples.

In the same way, we experience the Risen Lord today in regular, ordinary ways.  Through prayer, adoration, the celebration of the Eucharist and other sacraments, a quiet moment shared with a loved one, the experience of forgiving someone or being forgiven, etc., our God comes to us and shares His Presence with us.  May we, like the first disciples, recognize His Divine Presence among us and proclaim the Good News to all the world.

Apr 22, 2019

The Lord is Risen!  We have died with the Lord and have been raised with him.  Let us live as people bound for glory.

Apr 22, 2019

We have listened to the proclamation of several readings from the Old Testament, as well as the New Testament Epistle and the climactic reading of the Lord's Resurrection in the Gospel.  In light of this Good News, may we live always as people of the Resurrection, people of hope and joy.

Apr 22, 2019

Why do we venerate the cross of Christ?  only because we know that this is not the end.  No, we believe that everything -- especially the death of Jesus Christ on the cross -- ends in glory.  Knowing how all of this ends gives us the ability to 'celebrate' the death of Christ for our salvation.

Today more than ever, we must keep our eyes fixed on Christ.  As we walk with him the Way of the Cross and then celebrate his Resurrection, we must remember that he is always with us.  Even when things look bad for us we have to remember:  This ends in glory for those who follow the Lord. 

Apr 22, 2019

As we begin the great liturgy of the Paschal Mystery, we hear a lot of detailed instructions from our God.  God commands the Israelites to celebrate the Passover meal in a very specific way.  St. Paul teaches us what was handed on to him -- namely, how Jesus Christ celebrated the Last Supper and commanded us to "do this in memory" of him.  In the Gospel, St. John relates what happened during that meal, when Jesus washed the feet of his disciples and said to them, "What I have done for you, you must do for one another."  We would all do well to hearken to the words of the Blessed Virgin Mary, who spoke before Jesus' first miracle at the Wedding at Cana:  "Do whatever he tells you."

Apr 16, 2019

At this liturgy we ask God to bless the oil that will be used to anoint our brothers and sisters throughout the year.  God uses something so ordinary and commonplace -- the fruit of the olive tree -- to do something extraordinary today.  In the same way, God takes our ordinary lives and makes them extraordinary.  Finally, today we celebrate and honor the priests who serve us; men whom God has set apart to celebrate the sacraments and preach the Word to the assembly.  We thank God for the ordinary, commonplace things that are used to help us to experience God's presence and ministry among us.

Apr 9, 2019

The Gospel today gives us the account of the adulterous woman and Jesus.  Whereas some of the religious leaders were using the woman to test Jesus, Jesus used her to show us God's mercy.  Why is this Gospel passage given to us late in Lent?  One reason might be that it points us toward the redemption that is ours in Jesus' passion and death.  In his encounter with the woman who sinned, Jesus 'suspends her sentence'.  He tells her that she is free to go.  But who will atone for her sin?  Jesus Christ.  Next week we will focus especially on the cross of Christ, praising and thanking God for gift of redemption and atonement.

Apr 2, 2019

The Gospel for the 4th Sunday of Lent this year gives us the parable of the Prodigal Son.  This story, coupled with the words of St. Paul from the second reading: "For our sake God made him to be sin who did not know sin, so that we might become the righteousness of God in him" (2 Cor 5:21), teach us God's plan for creation.  God wishes that everyone be saved through His son Jesus Christ.  Like the father in the parable, God rushes to meet us and heal us and forgive us when we have sinned or wandered away.  He comes to us in Jesus Christ and in the Holy Spirit, and we receive His gift of salvation through the Church, the Body of Christ. 

Mar 25, 2019

In the middle of the season of Lent, the Scriptures for this Sunday remind us that we must turn away from sin and be converted.  What we began on Ash Wednesday now takes an even more serious turn as we are confronted with the final judgement and our conscience.  The disciples ask Jesus (in effect): "Why do bad things happen (to good people)?"  Jesus does not answer the question directly; rather he asks us to ask ourselves, "Will I be ready to meet the Lord when my time comes?"  St. Paul tells the Corinthians, "Therefore, whoever thinks he is standing secure should take care not to fall."  This is the acceptable time -- a privileged time -- to turn back to the Lord.

Feb 26, 2019

We were created for eternal Beatitude -- that is, eternal life with God.  After spelling out the Beatitudes in the Gospel passage from last week, Jesus tells us how we are to live so as to receive this gift from the Father.  In short, we must become more and more like Christ.  Specifically, we are called to forgive like Christ, love like Christ, and serve like Christ.  Today Jesus calls us to a radical kind of forgiveness: "Love not only your friends; love your enemies as well."

Feb 6, 2019

In the Gospel passage today we hear about Jesus' rejection in the synagogue at Nazareth.  We may tend to think that it was easy for him to face the anger and consternation of his kinfolk and neighbors, but as a human being I am certain that it affected Jesus.  Any of us who have faced slander or gossip or bullying (in person or online) know how hard it is to stand up to such injustices.  Jesus was able to endure these and many insults that were hurled at him because he KNEW that he is the Father's beloved Son.  I believe that Jesus replayed those words that were spoken at his baptism again and again all his life -- especially in the midst of danger and difficulty.  The same is true for us:  whether we heard it audibly or not, God spoke to us at our baptism:  "You are my beloved child; in you I am well pleased."  May these be the words that we hear the loudest -- and not the voices of violence and division around us.

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